Video conferencing: what it is and how it works

The business world is slowly waking up to the fact that video conferencing such as that featured on conferencegenie.co.uk could help to improve their operations in so many ways. You may wonder what video conferencing is, and what makes it so good, but there are reasons why your business should use it.

As with Conference Calling at conferencegenie.co.uk, it’s designed to make meeting with clients a breeze. It allows those with the technology to talk to people from different locations worldwide, meaning that a meeting can be arranged and held almost straight away, which takes the traveling and expense previously involved in meetings out of the equation.

Video Conferencing is a must for any company looking to save money, save time and boost levels of productivity. However, you may wonder how it works, and whether it requires a lot of work to set up.

To get started, you need the following equipment:

• Two or more webcams or video cameras
• The same amount of microphones
• A large monitor or projector, but a TV will work just as well
• A strong internet connection
• Speakers
• A data compressor
• Video conferencing software

Once you have all the right equipment, you need to decide whether you want to just do point-to-point or multi-point video conferencing. The former is for one-to-one meetings between two different locations. Meanwhile, multi-point video conferencing is for three or more locations.

Multi-point video conferencing is very useful, not least because it makes potentially complicated meetings easy. It requires a multi-point bridge to help make it possible, as this will ensure that real-time conversation can go ahead as planned. Usually, connection to a server is the way to go about it.

As soon as everything’s in place for you to make full use of video conferencing, you’ll be free to enjoy its many benefits.
Your business could save money and time by not traveling to meetings. Also, workers who get tired from traveling will be less prone to tiredness during working hours, while communication with clients will be streamlined and much easier to keep going over long periods of time.

OLED TV Buzz

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These new TVs are pretty amazing:

The biggest buzz so far at the Consumer Electronics Show comes from the new OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diode) televisions from the giant South Korean manufacturer Samsung.

Production costs had previously limited the size of OLED screens, which is why consumers mostly found them in cellular phones, and the only commercially available OLED television model had been the Sony XEL-1, an 11-inch model that debuted at the 2007 CES with a price of $2,500.

Samsung’s new televisions feature a 55-inch screen, an absurd 0.6-inch width, and a richness of color never before seen in commercial displays.

Check out the video and see for yourself. 3D TVs were a huge bust, but now these new super-thin TVs should generate some serious buzz.

Apple’s real iPad focus: TV

Steven Colbert with an iPad.The iPad may have been sold to the world as the device that will save publishing, but Apple has shown its real focus now that we’re just weeks away from release. According to the Wall Street Journal, Apple put the publishing content on the “backburner in favor of focusing on other content,” like a subscription-based television service.

Apple wants to make a sort of “best of TV” bundle available for a subscription fee, as well as offering episodic downloads for a dollar. Content providers have been wary of making any deals, likely because they’re afraid of getting burned like the music industry. Now that we’re years into the digital music business we can see that things haven’t been all bad for the labels, but there are probably some things they wouldn’t have agreed to if given the chance again.

It’s looking unlikely that we’ll see anything by the time the iPad launches, which leaves Apple in a position it knows well – using sales figures to produce contracts. The iPad has already had some nice presale figures. Once version 2.0 rolls out you can bet we’ll see more widespread adoption.