Get The Full Use out of Your Garage With the myLIFTER

If you own a garage then the one thing you can probably attest to is that for all the space in it, the moment you start using it for storage of any additional items is just the first step towards the day that you look a the clutter where your car used to be and think “Where did it all go wrong?”

Even if you’re an expert at keeping your garage from looking like a cut episode of “Hoarders,” you will probably agree that there is too much wasted space in your garage that is just out of range from being useful.

There’s a project on Kickstarter now, though, that aims to improve the storage effectiveness of any garage owner whether they be the meticulous planner, or the stuff it to stow it type.

It’s called the myLIFTER and it’s essentially an easy to assemble and use electric winch and pulley. Controlled by an iPhone app (or optional remote) and designed to take advantage of the higher, traditionally empty, space in your garage, each myLIFTER can support up to 50 pounds and can be combined for larger items. That means that a single unit may be good for holding some extra bags like this:

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Wheras multiple units can easily hold any number of unbelievable things such as this:

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Besides durability, ease of installation and use seem to be the biggest objectives of the myLIFTER designers. From everything shown, they seem to have accomplished that as this looks to be the simplest design of this type on the market that is still completely capable.

While that will obviously be easier to determine once the myLIFTER actually hits the market, considering that it has already passed its Kickstarter goal with some time to go, at least we know that a release date will come.

Of course if you’ve been looking at the pictures of this device in action and already formulating uses for it in your own garage, then be sure not to hesitate and pre-order one now while the funding is still going on.

Win Any Rubber Band War; Fear No One

When I think of rubber band guns, this is the image I get.

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However, if a company called XYZbot have their way, this could be the new face of rubber band warfare.

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That’s a rubber band gattling gun and while it, surprisingly, isn’t the first of its kind, it’s promising to be the very best. Fully automatic (naturally) this beast can store 128 rubber bands at a time, and is capable of firing up to 800 rounds per minute if you can load em fast enough. Battery powered and shipping as a multi-piece kit, the developers are saying it should take no longer than 30 minutes to assemble with the help of a screwdriver and a pair of pliers. However, they also advise that this gun not be used by anybody under the age of 12, and that it not be fired at other human beings, so until further notice let’s assume the entire listing as being tongue-in-cheeck.

Regardless this does appear to be the true future of rubber band warfare, and could be yours for just a $49 backing on the project’s Kickstarter page. Just remember that the powers may be different, the technology might advance, but rubber band war? Rubber band war never changes.

No One Panic, but the Wheel May Have Just Been Reinvented

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I’ve covered a lot of Kickstarter projects on this site, as the crowd funding behemoth proves to be an infinite source for the latest, and most interesting, projects currently out there.

But of all those Kickstarter projects, few have ever been so bold as a seemingly simple invention called the Shark Wheel, which claims to have reinvented the wheel.

It’s origin story is much humbler than its aspirations, as the story goes that one day creator David Patrick was playing around trying to get six pieces of interlocking cable to fit into a cube (which is apparently how eccentric geniuses entertain themselves), when he realized that upon dropping his created design, the shape he’d formed not only rolled, but rolled smoothly over a long stretch of ground.

As a lifelong skateboarder, David immediately realized the potential of this design, and modified it to create the Shark Wheel, a somewhat warped interpretation of the standard wheel that is designed to specifically reduce the amount of direct contact with the ground. Among other things, the benefits of that approach includes faster speed, better grip and control, and the ability to provide both of those features in wet or uneven terrain. In other words, by shifting the model of the traditional wheel slightly, it manages to provide the most desirable aspects of the regular skateboard wheel in a way that the old design cannot.

Now, the term skateboard wheel is being thrown around here, because that is the sole intention of this design’s function at the moment, as the Shark’s kickstarter campaign will net you 4 longboard wheels for a $50 donation.

While the inventor insists this design is not currently intended for use on an automobile or any other wheel dependent vehicle, it is nonetheless impressive that someone out there has managed to accomplish what was previously only referenced in terms of a joke and has actually improved the wheel, even if it is only in one specific capacity. It does go to show though that there is an infinite world of creative possibilities still to be explored, and, on its own, looks to be an impressive piece of design that any skateboarder should be intrigued by.

The Monkey Light Pro: Geek Made, Hipster Approved

As biking becomes more and more popular due to its financial, health, and environmental benefits, particularly among bearded twenty-somethings in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, we’re starting to see biking culture become a bigger and bigger thing.

For the most part, this has been a tame culture. Some biking outings, a few repair shops here and there, and of course some minor…err…accessorizing. Again though, nothing unusual.

Of course, it was only a matter of time until someone said screw it, and really just crafted something wild for the most eccentric of bicyclists. It turns out that time is now, that someone is MonkeyLetric, and the something wild is a series of LED lights that go on the spokes, and can create an almost limitless amount of images, such as these.

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Working off of a 4 piece LED unit that attaches to a bike’s spokes, the Monkey Light Pro is an incredible piece of technology not just because of its ability to create a moving image based on nothing but the bike’s momentum, but because of the creative potential of the images themselves.

Besides a few stock images that come with the device, considering that just about every file type is supported for uploading, and variables such as speed and looping abilities can be implemented, there really appears to be no end to the images that can be created, leading to some amazingly creative examples so far stemming solely from the invention’s creators.

Speeding towards its $180,000 goal on Kickstarter, and requiring a $695 baking to receive one, it’s looking more and more likely that we will be seeing these on the streets sometimes in the future. While it’s hard to tell if this will eventually be annoying, or even hazardous, for right now the creativity of the device makes it one of the more entertaining Kickstarter projects, and the best bicycle wheel enhancer since the baseball card.

The Game Stick: A Small Console that is Part of A Big Movement

One of the bigger stories of 2012 in gadgets was the success of the Ouya. The Ouya promises gamers a new type of game console that will be powered off the Android OS, and will retail for under $100 with free to play games, which could include thousands of titles, and serve as a  highly accessible development platform for small game developers everywhere.  It sparked a sizable wave of hype, and destroyed Kisckstarter records, as the idea of such a fresh game console took the public by storm, and had them throwing money at their computers to support it.

And now, not long after the release of the initial Ouya development kits, it appears the Ouya’s triumphant burst onto the gaming scene has left a gaping hole for other companies to join the party through. The latest, and most intriguing, is the Game Stick, a project of PlayJam. It’s intriguing, because it’s a console that is essentially just a controller and a USB stick that plugs into your TV’s HDMI port. From that simple set up, you have access to a substantial number of high profile Android based games available through the PlayJam Games Network service, as well as a host of additional titles the company are hoping to acquire from major Android developers.

Currently the creators of the Game Stick are looking for $100,000 on Kickstarter to start production, and are over halfway to their goal with 29 days to go.

2013 is set to be a huge, huge year in gaming, and you can’t belittle the Ouya’s role in that. Even if it achieves nothing greater than its current role as Kicstarter darling, the little system that could is proving that there is a market out there for a cheaper, simpler, open sourced gaming platform. While the Game Stick doesn’t appear to be quite on the same level of the Ouya as far as depth or available titles, it does offer further evidence that the indie and mobile markets are looking for a traditional platform that will allow them to stand shoulder to shoulder with the big boys to see how they measure up. At an expected $75 price point, the Game Stick may not prove to make that impact, but it could be a great way to get Android games on TV’s on a budget, and with minimal set up.