The All-In-One Pandora Looks Destined to Be the Future

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With phablets finding its way into the dictionary (along with twerking, which….well let’s leave that be), it’s pretty safe to say the hybrid style of devices is here to stay and will continue to be a major part of technology moving forward.

Just when you think you’ve seen it all though, comes the ultimate potential hybrid device, the Pandora.

Billed as a desktop/laptop/tablet hybrid, what separates the Pandora from just about every other similar device is a unique build that doesn’t make it natively comfortable as any of those three devices it can transform into, and instead allows it to truly become work with equal functionality in any form.

Measuring only 9mm thick, this impressive gadget can fold out into a 16:9 widescreen desktop monitor, while and L shape bend turns it into a 13 inch laptop complete with pop up keyboard for the lower half, which can then be folded back to form a Windows 8 powered 13 inch tablet. In any setup, the Pandora sports four speakers, a microphone, front and back cameras, and a flexible battery.

Further details such as the processing power and price are still incoming, so it’s still difficult to measure the full validity of this specific device, but whether or not you consider it to be the future of gadgets, it’s hard to argue that a design of this nature one day will be.

  

French Fry Vending Machine….That is All

While there is some debate if we have the Belgians or the French to thank for the french fry, it’s an argument that’s now entirely irrelevant as the Belgians have recently perfected the food by creating a french fry vending machine.

Now unlike those crappy hot fries Andy Capp has been trying to pawn off on you for years, these vending machine fries are the real deal, as for about $3.40 you get a cup of crispy fries just like momma used to buy them from your favorite fast food joint, and even a complimentary squirt of mayonnaise or ketchup.

You may have some, very valid, questions concerning the quality of vending machine french fries, and some equally worrisome queries regarding how well vending machine condiments hold up, but frankly not wanting a cup of french fries and dipping sauce for under 4 bucks in about a minute and a half is simply un-American.

Of course for the moment this machine of wonder and fried joy is only available in Belgium, but if you think there is a chance a machine that dispenses cheap bad decisions for your supposed nourishment won’t be coming stateside, you simply haven’t been paying attention the last half century or so.

  

Charge Your Batteries Through Your USB Port With This New Design

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Fewer and fewer devices in our life rely on batteries, but they are still prominent enough to insure that every now and then, you’ll fumble through your things looking for that final set of AA’s you are sure you had, and juggling between the ones in the Xbox controller and the TV controller as needed.

Rechargable batteries have been around for years to prevent scenarios just like those, and while they’re impressive technology in their own right, the classic rechargeable set up doesn’t quite feel up to speed with the modern tech world, and looks out of place in any home, not to mention the inconvenience it puts on travelers.

There is a design out there for a AA battery that looks to alleviate the modern issues with rechargeable batteries, by outfitting a standard AA battery with a USB plug-in. The set up would allow you to plug the battery into any USB port, and recharge it without any additional equipment required. Even better, the battery itself doubles as a 4GB USB flash drive for additional file storage.

Perfectly built for traveling, or really any use, this is not an idea without precedent, but it’s never looked more effective than it does with this design. Unfortunately it is just a design at the moment, and any plans past that concept are just that.

The inventor, Wonchul Hwang, sounds committed to making this concept work though, which is perfect, as so long as this device’s price doesn’t break the bank, everyone is going to want a couple of these around.

  

Defeat the Wine Cork, Once and for All

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Let’s take a moment to appreciate all the inventors out there who think of ways to improve aspects of our lives we never even knew was an issue until the solution is presented. In fact, to celebrate them, let’s pour a glass of wine.

Lucky for us, thanks to a recent device by one of those inventors, the process of celebrating with that wine just became easier.

The Coravin 1000 addresses the age old wine problem of removing the cork without looking like a complete amateur, or even risking the dreaded “break off” that even occupies a part of the professional wine connoisseurs mind.

That’s because the Coravin 1000 doesn’t require you to take the cork off at all, and instead uses a thin needle to pierce through the cork, while a pressure based system in conjunction with a spout lets you make normal sized pours, so you don’t lose an ounce of functionality, or a drop of wine.

More importantly though, it also doesn’t compromise the flavor of the wine by letting oxygen in. This is easily done while the needle is inserted, but the innovative part of this tech comes when you remove the needle, as the puncture it makes is so thin, it allows for the cork to reseal itself when you take the device off.

The $299 price point for the Coravin is steep, but wine is meant for occasions of relaxation and suaveness, both of which are harder when you are fumbling with a cork, and both of which come easier with this undeniably innovative and handy device.

  

Volvo’s Demonstration of Their New Automatic Braking System is a Must-See

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As a rule I like to be in control of a car completely while I’m driving, to the point where I often don’t even use cruise control. While some of that is wanting to experience the thrill of driving completely, there is a small part in the back of my mind that doesn’t trust leaving something so potentially urgent in control of a machine.

When it comes to features like self-parking cars, or even self-driving cars, then, I tend to steer clear.

However, looking at it practically, automated cars are the wave of the future, and will in some measure become commonplace in all models. Technicians at Volvo are working to make sure that inevitability isn’t one driven entirely by consumer curiosity and vanity, but rather filling basic needs to enhance driving for everyone.

Specifically, they are trying to perfect an automated braking system in commercial trucks that would allow them to avoid major collisions should the driver be dozing off at the wheel, or otherwise unable to properly react in time. Unlike some other “innovations” in the field like self-parking cars, this design appears to be frighteningly effective.

The truck in that video is moving at a steady pace of 40 MPH, and is about to hit two vehicles (one completely stopped, and the other moving much slower). In both cases though the automated braking system kicks in completely outside of the influence of the driver,once its realized the driver is not reacting, and brings the truck to a stop right before it collides with the vehicle.

What’s really impressive, yet somewhat scary, is the reaction time of this system. Obviously not wanting to “jump the gun” so to speak on stopping a vehicle automatically, the system waits until the last possible moment to initiate braking, and as such stops the truck mere inches away from danger, making the results look like something that wouldn’t be out of place in a Hollywood driving sequence.

While no specific plans regarding the implementation of this system in future vehicles are present as of yet, with Europe requiring similar systems to be mandatory by 2015, you can expect to hear more about this soon from Volvo and more manufacturers.

It might be scary to essentially trust your life in the hands of a system, but if they can really get it to perform as well in real road environments as they do in these situations, this could be the start of a safer, though still almost too close for comfort, future